Consumption of Alcohol During Pregnancy

13 Nov 2012

John Mason MSP (Glasgow Shettleston) (Scottish National Party): To ask the Scottish Government  how many mothers have been identified as drinking alcohol during pregnancy in each year since 1999, broken down by parliamentary constituency.

(S4W-10299)

Mr Michael Matheson MSP (Minister for Public Health)Data on the numbers of mothers identified as drinking alcohol during pregnancy have been collected on the Scottish Morbidity Record 02 (SMR02) form by Information Services Division Scotland from April 2003. Recording of this information has improved year on year but was not made mandatory until April 2011. It is anticipated that the figures for 2011-12 onwards will be more robust.

Copies of tables holding the requested data have been placed in the Parliament’s Reference Centre (Bib number 54455).

They show the numbers recorded for each component of this variable, the total number of mothers giving birth and the percentage of records that were not completed in each Parliamentary Constituency for years ending 31 March 2004 – 2011. Please note that data for year ending 31 March 2011 is provisional.

Figures for 2011 provisionally show that 3.7% of women reported drinking alcohol during their pregnancy.

Alcohol During Pregnancy

08 Nov 2012

John Mason MSP (Glasgow Shettleston) (Scottish National Party): To ask the Scottish Government  what action it takes to discourage mothers from drinking alcohol during pregnancy.

(S4W-10298)

Mr Michael Matheson MSP (Minister for Public Health): The Chief Medical Officer for Scotland’s advice is that alcohol should be avoided when pregnant or contemplating pregnancy as there is no known safe time, type or amount of alcohol during pregnancy.

This advice is incorporated into all relevant Scottish Government and Health Scotland publications and is included in Ready Steady Baby, a publication given to all expectant mothers.

In addition, the Scottish Woman-Held Maternity Record (SWHMR) includes a mandatory question on alcohol use, which midwives ask as part of the routine first midwifery or ‘booking’ assessment.

Through funding provided to the Alcohol and Drug Partnerships, work has been undertaken in maternity services to embed alcohol brief interventions (ABI) as part of routine clinical care at booking for those pregnant women who have been screened as requiring advice and support on stopping alcohol consumption during pregnancy. For women whose alcohol use during pregnancy is deemed as unsuitable for an ABI, care pathways into treatment services and additional support are available.

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

08 Nov 2012

John Mason MSP (Glasgow Shettleston) (Scottish National Party): To ask the Scottish Government  how many people are known to have fetal alcohol syndrome.

(S4W-10297)

Mr Michael Matheson MSP (Minister for Public Health): National information derived from routine data collection relating to Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is considered to be incomplete at present. Information is collected from systems which capture data relating to the health of babies shortly after they are born. Data are also available from inpatient or day-case admissions and also from the Child Health Surveillance Programme.

However, a diagnosis of FAS may not be obvious at the time of birth, and the only definitive diagnosis may be made as an outpatient and hence not available nationally.

A national surveillance programme for FAS has been in place since January 2010, funded by the Chief Scientist Office and Scottish Government for four years. In the first two full years of operation, this surveillance programme has identified
40 children under the age of six with FAS.

Trees

08 Nov 2012

John Mason MSP (Glasgow Shettleston) (Scottish National Party): To ask the Scottish Government  whether it considers that there should be a limit to the height of trees in urban settings.

(S4W-10111)

Mr Derek Mackay MSP (Minister for Local Government & Planning): The Scottish Government does not consider there should be a limit to the height of trees in urban settings.

The Scottish Government supports the High Hedges (Scotland) Bill, the objective of which is to provide a solution to the problem of high hedges which interfere with the reasonable enjoyment of domestic property.