Motion S5M-09772: Fat Cat Thursday

09 Jan 2018

That the Parliament notes so-called Fat Cat Thursday on 4 January 2018, which is the date in the new year by which top chief executives will have earned more than the average UK salary; understands that the figures are calculated by the High Pay Centre (HPC) and the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD); further understands that the average chief executive earns 120 times more than the average full-time employee, in spite of a reported fall in pay to top execs of a fifth; agrees with Peter Cheese, Chief Executive of the CIPD, that “we need a radical rethink on how and why we reward chief executives, taking into account a much more balanced scorecard of success beyond financial outcomes and looking more broadly at areas like people management”; believes that there is still much work to be done in tackling the problems of inequality that it considers have grown under poor management of consecutive UK governments, and calls on the UK Government to take further steps to curb excessive pay gaps in the workplace.

Motion S5M-09765: Offensive Behaviour at Football

09 Jan 2018

That the Parliament deplores the reported behaviour of some Falkirk FC fans at a recent match with Dunfermline Athletic FC regarding a player with a disability; welcomes that Falkirk FC has apologised unreservedly for the “abhorrent behaviour” of some individuals; considers that hatred towards or discrimination against disabled people is unacceptable in any walk of life, including in football; believes that there is a tendency for some fans to express more offensive behaviour at football than in their normal lives, and hopes that any review of hate crime in Scotland will take particular account of problems affecting football.

Motion S5M-09768: Rohingya Muslims

09 Jan 2018

That the Parliament deplores the reported military crackdown on the Rohingya Muslim population in Burma, which it understands has been described by the UN as “ethnic cleansing”; believes that the Rohingya are considered by many to be the “world’s most persecuted minority”, with them reportedly being denied citizenship and left effectively stateless since the country’s formation; understands that the recent military crackdown was ostensibly launched in response to attacks on police stations and, since then, the violence has grown; notes with concern reports of mass rapes, burned villages and displacement of more than half a million people by the military; deplores the decision reportedly taken by Burma to ban Yanghee Lee, a UN special rapporteur, from visiting the country; understands that the vast majority of the Rohingya refugees are sheltering in Bangladesh, with a deal to repatriate them to Burma being discussed by the two countries; notes the widespread concern, including by residents of the Glasgow Shettleston constituency, regarding the ongoing crisis in Burma/Myanmar, and notes the belief that extra pressure from the international community is essential to stop the violence and reach a lasting settlement.

Motion S5M-09766: UK Economic Failure

09 Jan 2018

That the Parliament notes the OECD’s revised forecast of just 1.2% growth for the UK economy in 2018, which, it believes, is due to Brexit uncertainty; understands that the forecast comes from the OECD Economic Outlook, Volume 2017, Issue 2, which was published in December 2017; further understands that the new figure would put the UK joint last among the 35 member countries for growth, alongside Japan and behind Italy with its projection of 1.5% growth; welcomes the analysis carried out by the TUC, which reportedly shows that British workers are likely to see their earnings fall by 0.7% in 2018 due to a rise in the cost of importing as a result of a fall in the value of the pound; understands that the TUC analysis highlights that only Spain and Italy are also expected to have negative wage growth, though both would outperform the UK; considers that the UK economy as a whole has been hopelessly mismanaged by the UK Government; believes that there is wide consensus that this economic slowdown is due to uncertainty caused by Brexit, with even the IMF’s managing director reportedly citing it as the catalyst; further believes that any economic damage already done shows the danger that a badly handled process could have for the Scottish economy, and calls on the UK Government to adopt a policy of seeking membership of the European single market to minimise uncertainty and protect living standards from the damage that it considers a disastrous hard Brexit could cause.